First time battery charging (Li-ion)?
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    First time battery charging (Li-ion)?

    Hi I've just received my mda compact II and it has a li-ion battery, could someone tell me how long I should charge it before I use it for the first time please I dont want to damage the battery on my first ever ppc

    Thanks

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    Untill it's fully charged (100%). I don't think you need to leave it for 10 hours or whatever some people claim - that's not necessary for Li-Ion batteries. Check out www.batteryuniversity.com for more information.

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    Thanks for the info, really good site

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    Thanks for the info, really good site :->

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    I don't know about that. I really believe new battery cells need to be properly bedded in. I've always left a new battery on charge for 10-12hrs at first. I rarely do top ups in general use and prefer to charge only when near empty. Once in a while also do a complete empty of battery before charge. I never had troubles with batteries doing this. I just got rid of my t68 of 4 years and the battery still holds charge like new, same as my 2.5yr old P900.

    Yusuf

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    Li batteries are lighter than equivalents in other chemistries - often much lighter. This is because lithium ions have an extremely high charge density?highest of all known naturally occurring ions. Li ions are small and mobile, but more readily stored than hydrogen. Thus a battery based on Li is smaller than one with hydrogen elements, such as nickel metal hydride or nickel cadmium, and with fewer volatile gases. The ions need fewer storage intermediaries, so more battery weight is usable as charge, instead of overhead.

    Li-ion batteries do not suffer from the memory effect. They also have a low self-discharge rate of approximately 5% per month, compared with over 30% per month and 20% per month in nickel metal hydride batteries and nickel cadmium batteries, respectively.

    Another advantage is that their lifespan remains relatively unaffected if they are kept "plugged in" after they have been fully charged. Other rechargeable batteries may degrade in these circumstances.


    Disadvantages
    A unique drawback of the Li-ion battery is that its life span is dependent upon aging from time of manufacturing (shelf life) regardless of whether it was charged, and not just on the number of charge/discharge cycles. This drawback is not widely publicized.

    At a 100% charge level, a typical Li-ion laptop battery that's full most of the time at 25 degrees Celsius, will irreversibly lose approximately 20% capacity per year. This capacity loss begins from the time it was manufactured, and occurs even when the battery is unused. Different storage temperatures produce different loss results: 6% loss at 0 ?C, 20% at 25 ?C, and 35% at 40 ?C. When stored at 40% charge level, these figures are reduced to 2%, 4%, 15% at 0, 25 and 40 degrees Celsius respectively.

    If the battery is used and fully depleted to 0 %, this is called a "deep discharge" cycle, and this decreases its capacity. Approximately 100 deep discharge cycles leave the battery with about 75% to 85% capacity. When used in laptop computers or cellular phones, this rate of deterioration means that after three to five years the battery will have capacities that are too low to be usable.

    Li-ion batteries do not suffer from the memory effect, but they are not as durable as NiMH or NiCd designs and can be extremely dangerous if mistreated.

    Li batteries are usually more expensive, since they use a newer chemistry and have more advanced applications.


    Permanent Capacity Loss versus Storage Conditions Storage

    Temperature 40% Charge 100% Charge
    0 ?C (32 ?F) 2% loss after 1 year 6% loss after 1 year
    25 ?C (77 ?F) 4% loss after 1 year 20% loss after 1 year
    40 ?C (104 ?F) 15% loss after 1 year 35% loss after 1 year
    60 ?C (140 ?F) 2 5% loss after 1 year 40% loss after 3 months

    Source:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Li-Ion

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    I didn't say they suffer from memory effect, I just found that their life expectancy is longer if given longer charge cycles rather than too often top ups. Many I know who just top up their battery every day or whenever in the car, find that their batteries tend to get tired after a year or so. I understand all the technical jargon that?s just been put, but as the saying goes, proof of the podding is in the eating...........

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    Quote Originally Posted by Y u s u f
    I didn't say they suffer from memory effect, I just found that their life expectancy is longer if given longer charge cycles rather than too often top ups. Many I know who just top up their battery every day or whenever in the car, find that their batteries tend to get tired after a year or so. I understand all the technical jargon that?s just been put, but as the saying goes, proof of the podding is in the eating...........
    And how would you know that the results/battery life wouldn?t have been the same (or even better for that matter) had you followed the manual?s advice?
    On the other hand, if you know better than the battery manufacturers and it works for you, by all means carry on!
    I follow the manual and also have good standby/battery life so maybe the bottom line is that it matters very little?

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    I don't know. I'm just comparing how long batteries last for people I know. I suppose it sust old habits die hard?

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